Our Flower Patch

Inspiring a new generation of growers


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The Crafted Garden by Louise Curley.

The Crafted Garden By Louise Curley

The eagerly awaited second publication by Louise Curley

Unfortunately I do not have as much time to read as I used to, apart from on holidays when I tend to lose myself in a grisly thriller by Tess Geritsen or Karin Slaughter. During the rest of the year the only things I manage to find time to read are horticultural books. They may be tending more towards the growing, top tips and advice about which varieties to grow for cutting, or more towards the arranging side of things. Not quite books, but I do also flick through bulb or seed catalogues to find new gems to grow in my own Flower Patch usually resulting in me selecting far too many “must have” tulip bulbs or dahlia tubers to grow. Obviously, they are all necessary purchases! One book I do find time to go back to again and again is the first book by Louise Curley “The Cut Flower Patch”. Avid followers of our blog will remember the review Cally wrote about it, if you missed it you can find it here. I still find it a source of inspiration and useful information. Therefore you can imagine I was eagerly awaiting Louise’s second book “The Crafted Garden”

The Crafted Garden is all about getting closer to natural items and using them to decorate our lives. Some of the projects could be used as decorations in your own home or to create items that could be given as very thoughtful gifts. Each project is thoroughly explained by Louise and beautifully illustrated with photographs by Jason Ingram. Each activity not only has a “How To” section explaining how to make the project, but contains background information and useful snippets about the plants, flowers, leaves or seedpods that are used to create it. The craft projects are arranged season by season, with plenty to get your teeth into in each section.

There are lots of projects that could easily be completed with children as part of your school garden group. There are also some that could be adapted to make them more child friendly, some projects may spark off an inspiration for you to take them in another direction with your garden group. But I’m sure you will gain many ideas from this book to give as gifts, for your home, school or for your sale tables at the Christmas and Summer fairs.

This is so much more than a garden craft book. By dealing with the horticultural elements of each of the “My Key Plants” used in each project, you will find out how to grow, propagate or be given suggestions of where to buy the plants used. As a grower I love this element of the book. It may mean that some of the projects take a bit longer to complete if you choose to grow the “ingredients” first from seed to complete an activity but that is all part of the journey of discovery. Rather than a tub of glue, glitter and stickers that will create something that is quickly discarded, some of the projects may live for weeks or longer, gracing your table or your windowsill, often with suggestions of then planting them into your garden to continue to grow and develop. It is all part of enjoying the changing of the seasons and appreciating what nature has to offer close up, kind of like the school nature table that so inspired Louise in her childhood.

Louise Curley - The Crafted Garden 01 (15th April 2014)

Delicate Spring flowers in eggshell vases.

One of my favourite activities is the eggshell vases. It reminds me of something I used to do as a child, but with the stylish twist of the weeping birch nest. A perfect way to see Spring flowers up close and remind us that the warmer brighter days are arriving.

The Crafted Garden by Louise Curley

Vibrant dahlias in squash vases.

I also love the squash vases. So bright and colourful and something I’ve not thought of doing with the ornamental or edible squash I grow most years. Perfect for a Harvest festival display in your home, or school. What a wonderful way of making just a few blooms look so special.

Louise also discusses responsible foraging, endangered moss and reminds us when flowers or plants are toxic. In a gentle way Louise helps us realise that creative projects can be made in such a way that they have a minimal impact on the environment. Reusing, re-purposing, recycling, re-creating and eventually composting your projects are all elements which are much discussed. Rather than traditional glitter why not use sugar frosting to bring a bit of sparkle to a Christmas table arrangement.

Louise has already inspired me to have a go at an unsealed terrarium. I potted up some offshoots of succulents into a variety of open topped glass containers. Here is one, as they say, I made earlier.

The Crafted Garden by Louise Curley

Succulent terrarium. Quick to make & very effective.

So if this review has inspired you to take a have a go at some of the projects in Louise’s new book take a look at the special offer we have for you. To order The Crafted Garden by Louise Curley at the discounted price of £13.99 including p&p* (RRP: £16.99), telephone 01903 828503 or email mailorders@lbsltd.co.uk and quote the offer code APG355.
*UK ONLY – Please add £2.50 if ordering from overseas.

Images extracted from The Crafted Garden by Louise Curley, photography by Jason Ingram. Published by Frances Lincoln.


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Getting ready for British Flowers Week

British Flowers Week Flag 2015

British Flowers Week is a celebration of British grown flowers and the florists who use them organised online by New Covent Garden Market. British Flowers Week this year is 15th June to 19th June. Lots of British flower growers are looking at ways to celebrate and spread the word about British flowers. On Friday and Saturday last week I had a stall with Saffy from Bath Flowers at the wonderful Toby Buckland Garden Festival at Bowood House.

British Flowers stall Myflowerpatch.co.uk ourflowerpatch.co.uk

We had a wonderful time selling British Flowers. Most of the flowers and foliage on the stall were grown on My Flower Patchbut we also had flowers from Clowance Flowers in Cornwall, a wholesaler who specialise in British flowers, and some amazing polytunnel grown Ammi and Cornflowers that Kate Gibbins of Windmill Farm Flowers grew in Somerset.

We sold jam jar posies, gathered bunches wrapped in brown paper, and bunches of ten Sweet William, perfect just as they are. We also made bespoke, celebration bouquets to order. Customers loved how scented the flowers are. Many people commented on how the scent of the Sweet Williams took them back to childhood and evoked happy memories. Some people noticed flowers that they had had on their wedding day, or those that grew in their Grandmas garden. One lady can be quoted as saying that our stall made her heart sing!

We also made some simple flower crowns, from twisted birch with flowers and foliage wired on. These were a big hit and looked great on lots of different people.

Man in a flower crown

Suits you!

Little girl in a flower crown ourflowerpatch.co.uk

A magical unicorn wearing a flower crown!

It was great to talk to so many different people about the flowers I grow. There was a huge amount of enthusiasm for British grown flowers, for their scent, their natural look and the environmental benefits of both growing them and also not importing flowers from halfway round the world. The bees loved our stand and we often found that as we were handing over a bunch of flowers to a customer we noticed that a bee was hitching a ride! A “free bee” with every bunch became a standing joke. So why not have a go at a British Flower stall yourself. Maybe as part of your school summer fair. To help you raise money for your young gardeners, to have a giggle and to help promote British Flowers. If you are doing a stall during British Flowers week do let us know and we can help spread the word.

As for the Garden Festival itself, we were too busy on the stand to partake of too many of the benefits of the event, but the people we talked to were all really enjoying themselves. They loved the setting at the beautiful Bowood House. They loved the range of stalls that were there, from wonderful plants and tools to delightful gifts and clothing. The food was amazing (I did manage to grab one of Truly Crumptious’s cinnamon sugar delights), Saffy loved the goat curry she had. The Festival atmosphere was second to none, wandering musicians, a Ukulele band, Stilt walkers and a children’s area with lots of fun activities and crafts to try. There was tree climbing for anyone over six brave enough to try, Croquet on the lawn and tours of the private walled gardens of Lady Lansdowne. There were two places for listening to talks. The Speakers Marquee and the Inspiration Marquee. There were talks given by such stellar horticulturalists as Toby Buckland, Anne Swithinbank, James Wong, and the only one I managed to squeeze in to listen to was the irrepressible Jonathan Moseley. Then in the Inspiration Marquee there was a packed programme with talks about meadow gardening, saving allotments, and talks from Chelsea Gold Medal winners such as Chris Smith and Rosy Hardy. So all in all, I would highly recommend attending the event next year. We are looking forward to it already if nothing else just to see our new found Horti friends again!

Toby Buckland, Sara Willman, Saffy Dodds Smith and Jonathan Moseley

Toby Buckland, Sara, Saffy and Jonathan Moseley (with a photobomb from Rob Hardy)

 


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Make it Happen! (Part 3)

 

International Women's Day 2015 Logo

International Women’s Day 2015

Here is our third and last part of our Make it Happen series for International Women’s Day. Last but certainly not least we feature Harriet Rycroft. Harriet used to be the head gardener at Whichford Pottery, she now describes herself as a free range gardener. Harriet is well know, or is that ‘notorious’ for her planting in pots, and you can now access her expertise through her course on Container Gardening through MyGardenSchool.com the next one starts in April.

Container gardening

Perfect Planting in Pots

My first gardening memory is sowing seeds of candytuft, cornflowers and love-in-the-mist in two little rectangles of soil in front of my brand new wendy house. I was amazed when they came up and flowered, and I can remember looking really closely at the flowers and being pleased that they were MINE! I was about five. My first jobs in the garden were probably picking fruit – my dad made a fruit cage, where we grew raspberries, blackcurrants, gooseberries and strawberries. Our dog liked to pick raspberries too, he did it very daintily with his lips, but we didn’t manage to train him not to eat them all!

I am inspired by lots and lots of other gardeners and the list grows all the time. There are gardeners who write inspiringly about their own and other people’s efforts, there are people who are brilliant at growing vegetables, amazing cut flower growers, people who have huge skills in training roses and trees into beautiful shapes, people who collect rare plants from far off places and people who work out how to make those rare plants happy in this country.

There’s one gardener who I really admire but I can’t mention her name because she works in a very grand place and is very discreet – but she manages a big team and a big budget with incredible attention to detail, and produces the most amazing flowers, fruit and vegetables; she has more skill and knowledge than anyone I can think of, is modest but determined and quietly assertive, and is very generous in sharing her knowledge.

I suppose the group of people which inspires me the most is the British women of the early 20th century, especially during the first and second world wars. They got on with learning about gardening and agriculture, which at the time were almost entirely done by men, and showed everyone that women can do those things too. Beatrix Havergal taught a lot of women at Waterperry and although it is said that Roald Dahl based Miss Trunchbull from Matilda on her (because she was very tall and I think she was quite fierce) it sounds like she was a very determined and fair teacher who made everyone work hard and to high standards, producing some of this country’s best gardeners.

I think it is very important to encourage young people to garden because our green spaces, both wild and cultivated, are shrinking all the time, and it is only when you get the chance to really immerse yourself in such a space and begin to find out how complex and fascinating it is that you realise how essential plant communities are to the world and to all the creatures that live there – including humans…

I think it is vital that girls (and boys) are shown at primary school age that getting outside and interacting with the natural world is a normal thing to do. I think many adults have become afraid of letting children explore for themselves, afraid of letting them get dirty and take a few risks, and that fear gets passed on to the kids. I have met far too many children who are afraid to get a bit of mud on their hands! I don’t think it’s helpful to make a big deal of it but we need to show them in an every-day kind of way how much we enjoy it and give them the freedom to experiment, the patience to observe the natural world, and the perseverance to try again if something doesn’t quite work.

As regards girls and gardening – whether amateur or professional – well, if we give them confidence in themselves and help them to challenge stereotypes and assumptions about gender roles plus the opportunities to try out as many things as possible, then those who enjoy it will do it.

I would like to say to girls embarking on horticultural careers: Do it on your own terms, don’t let people tell you that you can’t do certain things as there will always be a way of doing it that they haven’t thought of, horticulture is hugely diverse and there is room for everybody’s talents. Don’t be too proud to ask for help and advice, and remember to help other members of your team. Be interested and willing to try different things – for example don’t assume that machinery is ‘toys for boys’, there is no reason you can’t learn to operate and maintain it too. People (even other women) may not think of giving you the opportunity – don’t wait to be asked, if you see any interesting opportunity enquire about it. And don’t assume that the men in your team are all unskilled muscle – there are plenty of skilled and artistic men out there who just get asked to dig veg beds and mow lawns, equality works both ways!

Gardening well requires the ability to look at a task from many different angles – you need an awareness of science, history, even psychology, all with an artistic and observant eye. If you like being outside and you don’t mind getting wet/dirty/cold sometimes then go for it! Parents and teachers often EXPECT girls not to enjoy the more practical aspects of life but it’s easy to prove them wrong.

I remember helping a class of children at the local primary school to dig holes and plant daffodil bulbs all the way along a path, a really simple but quite laborious task – seeing their pride in the result the following spring was a real treat! So much of gardening seems like magic when you get your first little successes, and the best thing is that for many of us the magic never fades!

My desert island garden tool would be a little pointy spade only 2ft long, made by Sneeboer, a Dutch company which makes tools by hand. It’s great for splitting plants and replanting and it’s really sharp so you could find other uses for it too…

Plants are more difficult – if it really was a desert island I might want something edible like potatoes or runner beans (neither of which I could get sick of), but if I had to choose just one ornamental plant it would probably be a tulip bulb, or preferably a small assortment of tulip bulbs because then I could have fun cross-pollinating them and trying to produce new colours, which would give me something to look forward to.

Books – also tricky, but I’d choose something by Christopher Lloyd or Beth Chatto because they both bring plants alive in their writing and can be very funny at the same time.

My favourite thing about gardening? Being OUTSIDE! I’d hate to be stuck in an office all week.

Thank you so much to Harriet for answering our questions. You can find Harriet on Twitter and read more about her thoughts on gardening and other matters over on her blog A Parrot’s Nest

Harriet Rycroft

Harriet Rycroft

A final big thank you to our three fantastic contributors. It is exciting to see the passion and enthusiasm for gardening that you ladies display, and also that you are united in your commitment for engaging young people with the natural world. Something as you know we are committed to also with our Educational programme.

Just in case you missed any you can have a look back at the blogs by Rosy Hardy, and Christine Walkden.


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Make it Happen! (part 2)

International Women's Day 2015 Logo

International Women’s Day 2015

Welcome to the second part of our Make it Happen series of interviews with leading female horticulturalists in honour of International Women’s Day.

Today we are talking to Christine Walkden, who was kind enough to give us a telephone interview. I had to write very fast to keep up with Christine’s enthusiasm for gardening, but it was a pleasure to speak to such an honest and enthusiastic person.

You may well know Christine from some of her many and varied appearances on television. My favourite has been her appearances in The Great British Garden Revival, and also the Glorious Gardens From Above series. It was so interesting to see gardens from a different perspective, which even included Christine abseiling to do some cliffside gardening at St Michael’s Mount.

What is your first gardening memory?

At school every year from 5-11yrs old we were given a crocus corm, a yoghurt pot and some soil from the playing field to plant the crocus in. We were given them to plant and then they were taken away until they flowered. I loved the planting but it always bothered me that I didn’t get to look after them whilst they were growing, someone else was always given that job. They were brought back out when they were flowering. I wanted to be involved in the whole process. Even back then I loved the growing. It’s all about putting something in and getting something up.

Who is your gardening inspiration? 

Mother Nature. I’ve never been one for posters of people on my walls as a youngster I had pictures of flowers on my walls.

Why do you think it is important to encourage young people to garden?

It teaches them about life, the seasons, light, smells patience, understanding, companionship. It’s much more than just sticking in plants. It’s life and death, it’s a softer way to teach some of the concepts of life that can be tricky to get across.

The theme for International Women’s day is “Make It Happen” what are your top tips for helping young girls interested in a career in gardening, and how they can make it happen? 

Get as much practical experience as you can, even if that means volunteering for free. You can’t buy experience you can only gain it. Practical experience is so important, you can read things in books or on the Internet but it can’t replace practical experience.

What ideas do you have to help encourage young girls into gardening? 

Just do it. If you don’t succeed straight away, sow some more. We all have to learn skills like reading or riding a bike, or learning to drive, some take time, some are tricky. People expect miracles when gardening, why? Some of the skills of gardening can take time to master. Be persistent, don’t give up.The important thing is that people connect with nature, that a plant moves them. That’s what matters. Even if it is the joy of a dandelion, or making daisy chains, the connection with plants is the important bit.

Do you have any advice for girls or women looking at horticulture as a future career? 

The same – keep trying and persevere.The money may not always be there with gardening as a career but the reward is. You may not get a “flash lifestyle”. But I have had an amazing life, travelled the world and seen the most fabulous things and had fantastic experiences all because of my love of plants.

Sometimes young people find it difficult to see where a career will take them; some times they are focused more on financial reward than on lifestyle benefits. Gardening was never considered a decent job, but look at me now.

Teaching children the skills of horticulture can start them on a journey that can be continued later in life. It may be that they continue gardening as a career straight away, or it might be that they come back to it as a career choice later in life.

Do you have any anecdotes you would like to share about working & gardening with young people or in schools?

I just love the little kids with their twinkling eyes getting their hands dirty and enjoying it. I love it that they say they now do gardening at home because of me. One child told me they now have a greenhouse at home because of me – that made my day.

A child, who was considered quite a difficult child within the school, brought a plant in to show me, that he had looked after and nurtured. I asked him how he had got it started and he said it started in the garden and I liked it and it looked pretty and I thought you would enjoy it. He was caring for that plant and bringing it on. It was a hairy bittercress plant. That doesn’t matter – it’s the enthusiasm that he showed and the care and perseverance to make that plant thrive. I loved that.

When you are planting seeds with children you are planting a lifelong gift.

If you can tick their boxes and excite them you have them for life.

What is your desert island garden tool & plant?

Oh blimey! A hoe, ho ho ho! You’ve got to keep the blimmin’ weeds down to succeed. And if they get out of control you could always chop things down with a hoe, or use it to dig a bit!

Plant – Soldanella pusilla – it’s an alpine and I love its scale, beauty and tenacity. It can even flower in the snow.

At this point we had a chat about Latin names, and Christine was adamant that whilst Latin names are very important not knowing them shouldn’t hold people back from getting involved with gardening. It’s about engaging with the plant and enjoying it. Don’t worry about the name. That knowledge can come later.

What is your favourite thing about gardening?

The whole experience. The optimism. If it doesn’t work try again, it’s likely to succeed a second time. There’s always tomorrow.

Growing people and growing a garden is the same thing – you nurture a garden just like you nurture a child to get the best results. Make sure it has enough food and water, and that plants aren’t left to freeze in winter or bake in summer and you should be ok.

The gift of gardening can’t be quantified. The magical moments are the satisfaction.

Thank you so much to Christine for taking the time to answer our questions. You can find Christine on Twitter and her website diary will show you where she is appearing at shows and horticultural society talks so you might be lucky enough to hear her in person.

Christine Walkden

Christine Walkden

 


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Make it Happen!

International Women's Day 2015 Logo

International Women’s Day 2015

I’m writing this post on International Women’s day, the 8th March. The theme this year is ‘Make It Happen’

Recently we have talked to a number of prominent female horticulturalists about their careers and how they would suggest encouraging more young girls to ‘Make it Happen’ in the world of Horticulture. They were all so enthusiastic and helpful that we have decided to split their comments over a few posts. So in this post we will feature Rosy Hardy, of Hardy’s Cottage Garden Plants. Rosy is the most decorated female exhibitor at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show. Here’s what she had to say.

What is your first gardening memory?

Pruning Queen Elizabeth Roses in my grandmother’s garden.

Who is your gardening inspiration?

A lovely old lady called Miss Maisie Cunningham in Edinburgh.

Why do you think it is important to encourage young people to garden?

It is important that young people get off their backsides and go outside and enjoy the fresh air.

The theme for International Women’s day is “Make It Happen” what are your top tips for helping young girls interested in a career in gardening, and how they can make it happen?

Try to be practical and gain as much knowledge as possible about the plants you really love. Keep notebooks of plants of interest and any new horticultural techniques you may need this as reference.

What ideas do you have to help encourage young girls into gardening?

Yes, you can do it!

Do you have any advice for girls or women looking at horticulture as a future career?

Be happy to work outside in all weathers and don’t mind creepy crawlies.

Do you have any anecdotes you would like to share about working & gardening with young people or in schools?

Don’t put slugs down their necks.

What is your desert island garden tool? 

A pair of ARS snips.

What is your favourite thing about gardening?

The life of plants.

 

We want to thank Rosy so much for answering our questions. You can find Hardy’s on Twitter  and Facebook and you can find out when you might see or listen to Rosy and the Hardy’s gang by looking here.

Rosy Hardy, Hardy's Cottage Garden Plants

Rosy Hardy


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“When you see someone putting on his big boots, you can be pretty sure that an adventure is going to happen.”

Wellington boots on for adventures in school gardens.

Putting on your ‘big boots’ for an adventure.

We quite agree with this quote from one of the world’s most famous bears. Last Sunday January 18th was ‘Winnie the Pooh Day’, the anniversary of the birth of his creator A.A Milne. I don’t know a single child who hasn’t enjoyed the tales of Pooh and his friends in the Hundred Acre Wood. With his penchant for honey and reliance on bees, Pooh Bear would love the fact that we’re spreading the love for flower patches everywhere.

More flowers equals more nectar.

More nectar equals more bees.

More bees equals more honey.

More honey equals one very happy bear.

Winnie the Pooh is a kind bear who cares about his friends and always seems to be happy and positive. A fantastic role model for little people. He’s full of sensible advice for life like appreciating the little things, relaxing, and he knows the benefits of doing nothing from time to time, keeping life simple. We love his philosophy.

We could think of nothing better than celebrating the day by creating some artwork, reading a Winnie the Pooh story and holding a picnic with honey sandwiches in your school flower patch. After all, you’re creating your own ‘enchanted place’, a perfect patch to feed the bees and feed the soul. And as Pooh’s favourite day is ‘today’, it makes little difference if you’re a few days late celebrating the day itself.

And it won’t be long before your school garden group will be able to start sowing seeds to make your dream ‘bee friendly’ patch a reality.

If you like the idea of joining in the adventure with Our Flower Patch in your own school garden then take a look at our website for more information on how easy it is to become a member and start receiving weekly lesson plans for outdoor education activities.

Winnie the Pooh and friends having a picnic.

Winnie the Pooh and his friends have a picnic.


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Win a copy of ‘The Cut Flower Patch’ by Louise Curley

The Cut Flower Patch By Louise Curley front cover.

The Cut Flower Patch

I’m one of those people with a pile of books on my bedside table at various stages of being read. At the moment I have a couple of crime novels from the library, Jane Austen’s ‘Emma’, which I’m adapting for the stage for a local theatrical group, ‘The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry’ by Rachel Joyce, a business mentoring manual, Sarah Raven’s Christmas book and one which has been a constant source of inspiration and advice on the plot since I picked it up several  months ago. That book is Louise Curley’s highly readable and beautifully photographed insight into the home (or school) cut flower patch and is destined to grace my bedside table for many months yet. Louise is a regular columnist for the Guardian newspaper, Grow Your Own, The Simple Things and Gardens Illustrated magazines. I first came across her in her informative wellywoman blog and was delighted when I heard she was writing a book, telling the story of her cutting patch and offering inspiration to others.

Statice flowers perfect for drying.

Statice growing in a cut flower patch, perfect for drying.

Aspirational as well as inspirational Louise’s book is an enchanting yet  practical guide for anyone who wants to start a manageable cutting patch on their allotment or in the garden. She begins with a rationale for growing flowers both for pleasure and for wildlife and explains just how much can be grown in a relatively small space. There follow chapters on planning your patch (with top tips on what makes a good cut flower and suggested planting plans for beds), getting started, caring for your patch, cutting and arranging your flowers along with detailed notes on more than thirty annuals, biennials, bulbs, corms, tubers. There’s even a dedicated section on growing your own wedding flowers.

A bucket of freshly picked flowers.

Freshly picked blooms.

Louise also shows you how to supplement your patch with a spot of responsible foraging so that you’ll never be without something beautiful in your vase throughout the seasons. For those who like their advice in bite size visual chunks there’s a handy sowing and planting calendar and plot maintenance calendar included at the end along with a comprehensive list of Lou’s favoured resources. The book is liberally sprinkled with fantastic photographs by Jason Ingram, which really highlight the beauty you too could create at home or in your school garden.

Autumn collection, dried flower material and foraged berries.

Autumn Bounty. Dried stems and foraged goodies.

I can’t think of a better more readable book for novice flower growers who have been inspired to devote a bed or two to make a cutting patch or those who want to provide themselves with a vase or two of flowers every week for the home or to give to friends. Even more established growers will, I’m sure find plenty of handy hints and advice, and keep coming back for reference. Home grown flowers are in vogue. Rachel de Thame has been showing us how on Gardener’s World recently, an increasing number of flower farmers are growing and selling their blooms on a commercial scale and there is some indication that there will be a revival in local, seasonal flowers in the way there has in respect of local, seasonal food in the past few years. Sara and I have been spreading the flowery love around primary schools who are now preparing to supply parents and grandparents with blooms next year, as a clever and enjoyable way to raise funds for their school garden group.  Why not join the flower revolution?

British Flowers in a funky cardboard vase.

Fabulous vase! Gorgeous flowers.

Frances Lincoln have very kindly given us a copy of the book to give away to one lucky follower of our blog who is resident in the UK or Ireland. It’s a perfect early Christmas present for you or a friend (if you can bear to part with it).

All you need to do is subscribe to this blog, via WordPress or follow by email and leave a comment telling us the name of your favourite flower.

We’ll put all the names into a gardening hat in two weeks and get one of our young growing apprentices to draw out the name of the lucky recipient. We’ll publish the name of the winner here on November 18th.

If you can’t wait till then to get your hands on The Cut Flower Patch, you can buy it online and through independent bookshops, or via the RHS shop.